Dolce Far Niente

The Italians coined the expression almost one hundred years ago, but the concept dates back to the ascent of man—and woman.

The sweetness of doing nothing—what an amazing idea. As I hunt around for thoughts to adorn my page, I come across Psychology Today. One paragraph takes my fancy.

All the noise—the Facebook, the reality TV, the latest and greatest no-one-can-get-in-there-without-calling-a-month-ahead restaurant—it all fades away when we can just do nothing. What surfaces is life—our feelings at the moment (whether it be grace or despair), our ego vanishes and our true self emerges.

For those who do very little, it’s a challenge to get anything done. For others—my world—the difficulty is switching off.

But I’ve taken a few days downtime in southwest Europe—a close friend asked about my blog, and I woke up this morning with an urge to write. It’s nine in the morning on a Monday, so in a way this feels like dolce far niente—I mean, who has the time to string a few idle sentences together on the first day of the week except someone with absolutely nothing to do?

And that’s all I’m doing this morning—drawing a few circles in the sand and hoping to lure you into my world of thoughts and dreams—but maybe I think too much.

Everywhere I turn, folks are working as hard as they can at doing absolutely nothing—on beaches, in bars and restaurants, walking around…

Off the main drag there’s a strip mall—or at least as close as it gets to that in this part of the world. There are a couple of low-budget restaurants—I walked by one on Saturday morning and it was empty and desolate—how can anyone turn a buck here, I wondered. In the early evening it was jam-packed, the tables decorated with dubious-looking pizza, the patrons smiling and laughing.

It’s good to come here and feel this vibe—this is where ordinary, decent, local people take their holidays—the purse strings rule, so the vacation is tightly regimented. Ten miles east, we’re in Plaza del Privilege—this is where the north Europeans come to roost—a land of riches, rosés, and risottos.

And yet, the strip mall is a maze of discovery. Across from the restaurants is an Italian bar, blooming with red, white, and green bunting—I was expecting it to be staffed by fake Italians, but no, this is the real deal.

And along from that is a budget supermarket—and in the early evening it’s brimming with people who suddenly woke up from their idleness and collectively realized it was dinner time. Spanish people gabbling incomprehensibly, bright red Brits emerging with cases of beer, serious-looking Germans contemplating fiscally responsible purchases, and locals scraping for staples—inflation does not sit idly by.

The queue is huge, the tellers look exhausted, and the season’s only half-way in! And no one seems to use the automatic tills—I marvel at this mystery as I ring up my red wine, dodge the crowd, and retreat to idleville.

And then, next to a bar showing a soccer game on a big screen, is… a sex shop—rather out of place, it occurs to me, amid these more prosaic amenities and kids out with the family for an evening stroll.

And whereas the window dressing might provide a hint of the delights within, perhaps with a few pieces of seductive lingerie or a partly camouflaged sex toy, this store goes straight for the gonads, with the most diverse collection of dildos on show for all to peruse.

I pause a moment to wonder what boxes a woman ticks as she makes her choice on such an important item of holiday apparel—but I’ve led far too sheltered a life to arrive at a meaningful conclusion.

It really is a skill of the highest order, the art of doing nothing.

The India Road, Atmos Fear, Clear Eyes, and Folk Tales For Future Dreamers. QR links for smartphones and tablets.

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