Across The Universe

Universality is a unifying concept.

Aristotle coined the term ‘natural philosophy’ to describe the science of physics—in fact the Greek word φυσική, or physics, means knowledge of nature.

Rutherford reinforced that by stating ‘All science is either physics or stamp collecting’, which pissed off not a few colleagues.

The big idea behind physics is universality—principles that apply anywhere and everywhere—an example would be Newton’s second law, f=ma, which can be applied to the acceleration of gravity, the Gulf Stream ocean current, or a running dog (whether imperialist or not).

Universality also applies to a select group of three languages—Math, Music, and Love.

The three are strongly connected—love and music, duh; love and math in areas such as symmetry, reciprocity, and yes, antagonism; math and music? Well, that’s what I want to talk about today.

Most kids warm naturally to music—it’s formative: even the most tuneless parent soothes their child with some trivial tune—and children are thankfully tone-deaf in their early years.

When humanity began to make sense of sounds—millennia before the concepts of frequency and wavelength were formulated, let alone calculated—singers and players began to define scales.

A scale ends at a pitch (or frequency) that is double where you started—since the speed of sound is constant, that must be half the wavelength. The last note in the scale is an octave higher than the first note—the clue’s in the name, there are eight notes in a scale, the last one being the octave.

The English, ever practical—or perhaps anxious to be different from everyone else—called them A,B,C,D,E,F,G,(A)—the rest of the world uses Do,Re,Mi,Fa,Sol,La,Si,(Do). And since Do (or Doh) is C rather than A, that further complicates matters—next thing you know they’ll want to drive on the left!

So clearly A stands for arbitrary and C for The Continent, which one should steer well clear of—but music, like math, becomes complicated because of the way it’s taught.

There’s a whole body of science that derives from classical music, including a notation system (a staff or stave), and traditionally kids learn through variations on this (classical) theme. Scales are many and varied, with roots (pun alert) in Ancient Greece—for instance the Lydian and Dorian—or Persia.

Through the years, things have undoubtedly evolved—I googled ‘modern music lessons’, and the first hit was modernmusicschool.com—in Tehran, of all places. A little further down it says ‘Book a free trials lesson now!’, which given the nature of the Iranian regime, might well come in handy.

The school claims it will teach your favorite songs, but I wonder how one of the more popular offerings from the late great Janis Joplin would go down with faculty (it’s in D, by the way). As for the pics…

All children—except those with no interest at all—should learn music, precisely because of its connection to the other two universal languages, and the role it plays in our happiness—it’s so much easier to sing your blues away than to try to tell people about your heavy heart.

But kids don’t need to learn a lot of music theory—very little, in fact. And picking up on Aristotle, children will arrive at their own conclusions through inductive reasoning just like the early rock n’ roll artists, and the Beatles and the Stones did.

If you play a minor, it’s a sad song—you play a seventh, you’re hanging on the edge of the eighth floor, and you need to resolve—either jump off or get back in.

The fact that’s it’s actually a minor third or a dominant seventh is something you might be curious about at some point down the road, but right now it mustn’t stop you playing your favorite songs—Iranian or otherwise.

When you ask Wikipedia about the dominant seventh, it’s enough to put you off your lunch.

In music theory, a dominant seventh chord, or major minor seventh chord,[a] is a seventh chord, usually built on the fifth degree of the major scale, and composed of a root, major third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh. Thus it is a major triad together with a minor seventh, denoted by the letter name of the chord root and a superscript “7”. An example is the dominant seventh chord built on G, written as G7, having pitches G–B–D–F…

Keep it simple for children, add complexity as needed. The other thing you quickly understand about playing music is you have to count. Not really math, just arithmetic—it’s the three ‘R’s: Rock, Roll, ‘Rithmetic—musicians count with their feet, leaving the hands free for other tasks.

So there you are—if you can’t count, you’re shit out of luck.

When it comes to music, both Paul McCartney and I are self-taught.

I guess he just had a better teacher.

The India Road, Atmos Fear, Clear Eyes, and Folk Tales For Future Dreamers. QR links for smartphones and tablets.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


%d bloggers like this: