Bayraktar

I like a good acronym—at the moment I’m attempting a revolutionary new diet called SATNAV—Soup At Night And Voilá!

So far, it’s been at best moderately successful because I only use it at home—and there’s been a lot going on. Its other failing—perhaps even its Achilles heel—is that it doesn’t include wine. So, we’ll see how it goes—but at least the acronym is fun.

No one does acronyms like the military—the US armed forces are particularly fond of them. I suppose partly because their comms are a closed vocabulary of bellicose brethren, and perhaps also there’s a perception that terse terms are efficient and warlike.

I recently came across a typical milac—that’s the kind of abbreviation they’d use.

MALE—Medium Altitude Long Endurance. Who makes these things up? You might be forgiven for thinking it describes a middle-aged man’s penis, but in fact this is a term used in droneworld. I suppose if I pursued the penile permutations, ‘L’ might stand for ‘Little’ in more than a few cases, and an elderly fellow would have LOSE—Low Orbit Short Endurance—but I digress.

One of the best things about acronyms—and here comes the apex of digression—is that the good ones have multiple meanings. It might shock the military-industrial aeronautical complex to learn that MALE also stands for Married And Losing Everything—although I would have thought DALE (i.e. divorced) would be a better fit.

My favorite? Mothers Against Lousy Education. This is apparently from Egypt, so I’m perplexed that the acronym is not in Arabic—when I was there, I found hardly anyone spoke more than five words of English, presumably due to lousy education.

But in the world of military aviation—particularly of the unmanned persuasion, aka unmanned males—we’re talking about machines that fly at an altitude of 10,000 to 30,000 feet (3-10 km), and are autonomous for one to two days.

Like any other weapons system, as soon as it’s invented it becomes an arms race. At the latest count, at least twenty-three countries manufacture these MALE babies. The recipes are on the net—it took me seconds to find a research paper describing the ’11SYNERGASIA_6_629 Hellenic Civil Unmanned Air Vehicle – HCUAV.’

The C stands for Civil, but it becomes an increasingly narrow path as we meander along.

Perhaps the best-known MALE is the Predator, widely used by the USAF in Bosnia, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, but there are many others, including Chinese, Russian, European, and Israeli offerings.

Military equipment means big money, but concerns about its use often lead to export restrictions—the same happens with the application of sanctions, and the end result is often that nations develop competing products in-house.

The US and Turkey couldn’t reconcile their differences on the sale of MALE armed unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, because the American administration was concerned about their use against the Kurdistan People’s Party, or PKK. The Kurds have a long history of struggle against Turkey, and the PKK is a major thorn in Erdogan’s side—the Turkish regime wouldn’t hesitate to use UAVs against them.

Deprived of Predators, Reapers, and the like, the Turks rolled their own.

What they came up with was the Bayraktar, an armed drone that has become famous during the Ukraine war.

The drone’s TB2 model is capable of flying for twenty-seven hours at an altitude of eighteen thousand feet with a payload of four laser-guided missiles. According to the manufacturer, Baykar, the UAV is exported to thirteen countries which include Qatar, Azerbaijan, and Ukraine, and it has logged four hundred thousand hours of flight.

In the Ukraine war, the TB2 has become wildly successful at taking out Russian materiel, including tanks, trucks, and surface-to-air missiles. The joy it’s given to the Ukrainian armed forces prompted a song—not the best song in the world, but one with vivid images, English translations, TikTok offshoots, and a number of versions—even one that’s an hour long.

When your family and friends are dying, heart is where the hope is.

The India Road, Atmos Fear, Clear Eyes, and Folk Tales For Future Dreamers. QR links for smartphones and tablets.

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