Bed and Brexit


Towards the end of 2020, I bought a new bed.

The acquisition of a bed, as the manufacturers and salespeople love to tell you, is a transformative life decision—between bed and mattress, you’re entrusting a large part of your mental health to an inanimate object.

Bedtime makes up a third of your life, unless you’re Japanese—the land of the rising sun has a special word, Karoshi, for death from overwork.

Since this is the first bed I’ve bought in decades, and the first new bed I’ve ever owned, I did some hunting around—in a pandemic, that means surfing. I looked close to home, gravitated to a couple of the big London stores, saw a couple of things I liked, and then decided to go straight to the motherlode.

The guys I ended up doing business with have a factory in the British countryside—on land that belongs to the crown (no, not Netflix, silly). And very nice they were too—we talked prices and discounts, overseas shipping, the usual deal, and finally settled the matter just after the beginning of winter.

I was keen to wrap up the deal prior to Brexit, since with a 2020 invoice, the export of said bed to the European Union would attract no duty—how wrong I was.

Turns out that any goods shipped from the UK after December 31st 2020 are thoroughly in the dog house. The norm is to get hit with a triple whammy of VAT, customs handling charges, and ancillary costs—as the saying goes, you make your bed and lie in it.

The obvious consequences of these trade barriers were stated repeatedly and with vigor by remainers—now, the chickens are coming home to roost. Said chickens, should they be of UK provenance, are stuck in bonded warehouses prior to import payment and release.

Businesses that sell or import British food products (I know, a bit of an oxymoron there) are well and truly stuck. Not only have costs gone up significantly, but shelves are empty because of transport delays—in maritime jargon, British exports to Europe are going through a bit of a pen pal—that’s my very own Cockney rhyming slang—Suez Canal.

The UK Food and Drink Federation (FDF) released what can only be classed as dismal numbers comparing the top British food and drink exports to the EU in January 2020 and one year later. I worked them up into a chart, which shows how hard the food industry was hit.

Whisky and salmon are both from Scotland—the Scottish people, who voted to stay in the Union, must be appalled at this sorry mess. Beef also got hammered—the Scots produce Angus cattle, so a triple whammy there.

And when it comes to fish, which salmon apparently is not, this includes all the shellfish industry—the export of live oysters, mussels, and scallops, along with langostines and crabs, is very much a Scottish business, although Wales also has an important mussel production.

The pandemic also accounts for some of this reduction, given how hard the hospitality industry in Europe was hit—and still is, with multiple lockdowns in practically every EU nation.

But a lot of it is Brexit—the double punch of the end of frictionless trade with Europe and Covid has meant the swansong for many small businesses—family-run outfits, often in small places, that help anchor communities.

In total, Bojo’s social experiment has shrunk the trading landscape of foodstuffs from almost six hundred billion dollars to one hundred forty-one—a decrease of seventy-five percent.

And that big brass bed? I’ll let you know when it gets here.

The India Road, Atmos Fear, Clear Eyes, and Folk Tales For Future Dreamers. QR links for smartphones and tablets.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: